Chapel Banners

Symbols of the Christian faith are presented in a spectacular way in The Amelia Plantation Chapel through the art of needlepoint. Seasonal banners combine with Chapel furnishings to reveal the knowledge of the Lord to those who have never known Him and to bring remembrance to believers of God’s promises and blessings. The needlepoint for the Chapel was designed by Susan Witt of Columbus, Georgia, and was stitched entirely by Chapel members. The total project was completed in less than two years. It is our prayer that each visitor to our Chapel will experience the presence and love of God though these symbols of faith and, in turn, share that faith with others.

Two symbols, The Tree of Life and the Seven Branched Menorah can be found in each piece of needlepoint. The Tree of Life is associated in Scripture with experiencing the life of God in Heaven. In Proverbs it is represented as Wisdom, Righteousness, Helpfulness, Hopefulness, and Wholesomeness. The Seven Branched Menorah represents the presence of God.

The Advent Banner. . .

The major symbols used in the Advent banner are a scroll, the Messianic Rose, and the Alpha and Omega monogram. The scroll proclaims the prophecy from Isaiah that “a virgin will bear a son.” The Messiah is depicted in the Old Testament as a rose. In the New Testament He is seen as Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. Purple is the predominant color of this banner.

The Epiphany Banner. . .

The five-pointed star is the symbol of Epiphany when Christ was made manifest to the Gentiles by the guiding of the Star. In Numbers 24:17 we read, “There shall come a star out of Jacob, and a scepter shall rise out of Israel….” Isaiah 60:3 says, “And the Gentiles shall come to the brightness of thy rising.” The Gospel, or the Good News, of the Savior is depicted by the symbols of a winged man for Matthew, a winged lion for Mark, a winged ox for Luke, and an eagle for John. This banner reminds us of the Great Commission which instructs Christians to “go and teach all nations.”

The Lenten Banner. . .

The Lenten Banner depicts Christ’s suffering and sacrifice. The Cross and all it represents is the main symbol. Other symbols of the Passion of Christ are the passion flower, a nimbus, a spear, and the disciples who fled. The Scripture, “He hath borne our griefs and carried our sorrows,” offers hope in the midst of looking backward to his suffering.

The Easter Banner. . .

The symbol of the lily is dominant in the Easter banner which celebrates the Resurrection. The Easter lily comes from a bulb which appears to be dead but when planted in the earth it sprouts forth in new life. The Scripture, “He is Risen,” gives hope for the future with the risen Christ.

The Pentecost Banner. . .

Pentecost celebrates the birth of the Church. The gift of the Holy Spirit is symbolized in the descending dove, accompanied by tongues of fire. Vines and fruit shown in the banner represent the church as described in John 15.

The Chairs. . .

The four chairs in the Chancel of the Chapel represent each of the Persons of the Trinity and the Trinity itself. The chair symbolizing God the Father depicts the Six Pointed Star. Each point of the star represents an attribute of God. In the seat of God’s chair is the symbol of love, which is the red rose. The symbol for God the Son is the Alpha and Omega monogram, which are the first and last letters of the Greek alphabet, symbolizing that Christ is the beginning and the end. The seat of the chair contains olive branches, the symbol of peace. The dove is the symbol for God the Holy Spirit. The dove is the embodiment of power and life, as is the believer who is empowered by the Holy Spirit. The seat contains grapes, the symbol for the Fruit of the Spirit. The symbol for the Trinity is the fleur-de-lis with its three divisions. The seat design is wheat which represents the harvest of believers. God uses believers in the gathering of the harvest of souls.

The Wedding Kneeler. . .

Pentecost celebrates the birth of the Church. The gift of the Holy Spirit is symbolized in the descending dove, accompanied by tongues of fire. Vines and fruit shown in the banner represent the church as described in John 15.